Adjusting the tracking and scrolling speeds on a mouse is a small thing, and yet it makes working on a computer a whole lot better. I’ve been using the computers in the labs at BYU for the past little while (as I shop for a new computer). The very first thing I do when I sit down at the computer is adjust the tracking and scrolling speeds, switch the scrolling directions, and add “mission control” as a mouse shortcut.

I have yet to see anyone around me adjust the settings for their mouse.

Instead, they drag and lift, drag and lift, drag and lift, over and over again with their mouse. It takes them extra time to browse the internet, extra time to edit documents, extra time to create, and work, and finish.

And yet, they don’t realize they can make a small adjustment that would simplify their life dramatically.

Should I tell them? Well, you’d think so. But going around to the people around me day after day and telling them they can adjust the scrolling and tracking speeds on their mouse would be, well, too time consuming for me, and unfortunately would be viewed as “meddling” for many others.

If people were more willing to accept feedback and suggestions, then I’d probably do it. But in my experience, most people don’t really go for that.

I wonder how many things we could do better if we knew better.

I wonder how many great suggestions we would receive if we were open to receiving them.

I wonder how much time we’d save if we used the tools and technology available to us.

And notice I’m using the word “we”. I’m including myself in this one.

I’m sure there are several things that I could do better, or more efficiently if I just knew how. We all miss things. There is always more to learn.

But some people don’t have that mindset. They are content with how they do things, and don’t go looking for ways to improve.

But I have that mindset.

I’m regularly looking for ways to improve.

Not obsessively.

Efficiently.